Can I avoid being a burden to my co-workers?

Discussion in 'General Advice' started by hfowle1, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. hfowle1

    hfowle1 New Member

    Hello to all:

    I am new to this site and I'm hoping for some helpful advice on how to make a successful transition from an on-site office situation to a remote, home office.

    I have been working in an illustration studio for two years and I will soon be moving. Graciously, my employer has agreed to keep me with the company and allow a remote office from my new home. All of our work and client correspondence is digital, so that should be no problem.

    My only concern is that I want my physical absence to have as little impact on my co-workers as possible. It is a small company (~20 people). Making others scan and email me something that I used to be able to simply walk over and collect may cause some frustration.

    This is a difficult problem to solve, but I would certainly welcome any advice on how to prevent your physical absence from becoming a burden to others.

    I accept that I will rely on my coworkers to spend some time transmitting materials to me, but how can I keep this as easy for them as possible?

    Many thanks!
     
  2. CarrieLyn

    CarrieLyn Guest

    Hi there,
    You may want to look into remote computer hosting. That way you can have access to the entire company database from your home so you'll be less likely to need support from the office.

    Congrats on being allowed to work from home, I hope it turns out good for you!
     
  3. getagrip

    getagrip Gold Member

    I would meet with your co-workers before the move and find out what kinds of things might cause an inconvenience. Once you have identified what these things are, you can then start brainstorming on ways you can be as efficient as possible without getting in the way.
     
  4. onera

    onera New Member

    All digital contents can be uploaded to a shared drive and you will be able to download them. There is no way to avoid physical contents being scanned and sent digitally. You may designate one of your co-worker do all the scanning and transmission and, in turn, you can take a couple of hours of his/her works to relive the extra work burden from his/her shoulders.
     
  5. talfighel

    talfighel Silver Member

    CarrieLyn: You may want to look into remote computer hosting. That way you can have access to the entire company database from your home so you'll be less likely to need support from the office.
    I would do the same thing. Great advice.

    Tal
     
  6. Dana K

    Dana K New Member

    I agree that you should discuss this with your co-workers. There may be one person more able/willing to handle the task of scanning & emailing.

    Brainstorm with your co-workers on a win/win solution. Most people have job duties they don't like. Is there a duty you could assume in exchange for their help?
     
  7. payment proof

    payment proof Well-Known Member

    CarrieLyn: You may want to look into remote computer hosting. That way you can have access to the entire company database from your home so you'll be less likely to need support from the office.
    I also agree. I've had some jobs in the past that allowed me to telecommute, and I was able to access company databases, e-mail, etc. remotely through a secure connection. The only draw back is it was a bit slower than actually being on site.

    Good luck with your new work at home position.
     

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