Chess, Sore Losers, And How It Relates To Success Or Failure

Discussion in 'Casual Chat' started by getagrip, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. getagrip

    getagrip Gold Member

    So I'm playing this game of internet chess today, and I see a chance to take my opponents Queen with my Knight. Of course, my success is dependent on my opponent moving their piece to a certain spot. Many moves in chess are about "baiting" people or setting up certain situations where you can capitalize on the moves your opponents make in reaction to your move.

    So I move my Knight and sure enough, my opponent makes the move I want them to make. BAM - I put their King in check, and take my opponent's Queen.

    My opponent resigned, and then said, "I gave you that one".

    My reply was, "I planned that move".

    My opponent replied, "It was a mouse slip".

    And then we went back and forth until finally, I had a chance to play my opponent again, and sure enough, I won again.

    Since my opponent couldn't blame this one on a mouse slip, my opponent said,

    "Those were some strange moves. You must have gotten help",

    To which I replied, "I beat you fair and square in BOTH games".

    We went back and forth, and I told my opponent to learn to lose with dignity...

    Isn't that just irritating? Some people like to blame everyone else for their mistakes, and won't take responsibility for their failures.

    However, some people admit where they went wrong, learn from their mistakes, and keep playing the "GAME" to get better.

    Don't be a sore loser! Don't blame others for your mistakes! Give credit to where credit is due! If you slip, get back up. When you "lose", admit you got outplayed or made a mistake, and play another game. Whether you win or lose does not matter. What matters is how hard you tried! [​IMG]
     
  2. A8ch

    A8ch Gold Member

    getagrip: Whether you win or lose does not matter. What matters is how hard you tried!
    Very true, Grandmaster! [​IMG]

    Hermas
     
  3. getagrip

    getagrip Gold Member

    Thanks, but most grandmaster's can probably beat me in about 5 moves! [​IMG]
     
  4. Vishal P. Rao

    Vishal P. Rao Administrator Staff Member

    getagrip: Whether you win or lose does not matter. What matters is how hard you tried!

    And how much fun you had!
     
  5. getagrip

    getagrip Gold Member

    Its been a strange day of chess. After you play a game, most people say "good game" or "gg" or "thanks" or "thx". However, after someone just kicked my butt (no, I didn't accuse him of cheating), he wrote:

    ||*(

    Since I have no idea what that means, and given my "sarcastic" side, this is what I wrote back to him:

    #$%#$ &$%%^ *** @#$#@$

    I hope he knows what that means because I sure don't! [​IMG]
     
  6. Newbie Shield

    Newbie Shield Gold Member

    Years ago I played chess - with ratings and a timer - online and kept running into similar situations or worse. Once I tired of the nonsense, I started playing against the computer.

    Same is true with all games. I no longer play games online but I do play them on my computer.

    ~Newbie Shield~

    PS. The only way to get good at chess is to learn to think ahead several moves and to practice classic moves with a chess book open right next to you. Like anything else, it's not a quick or easy study.
     
  7. getagrip

    getagrip Gold Member

    Newbie Shield: PS. The only way to get good at chess is to learn to think ahead several moves and to practice classic moves with a chess book open right next to you.

    Actually, you can get quite good at chess by playing other people. When I started playing online, people were kicking my butt left and right, but as I played more, I started to pick up on the strategies they were using, and started to use them against my opponents!

    I have briefly studied some chess books, and I know that I can improve my game if I studied more, but in some ways, that takes the fun out of it...
     
  8. AnthonyS11

    AnthonyS11 New Member

    I know several sore losers....and this is completely true!
     
  9. Selling7116

    Selling7116 New Member

    I like how you think seeing moves ahead of you are a great asset to your career. Some people do not know what is about to happen to them. Being able to see a move way ahead is what I call smart. The smart people learn it first. Once the door is closed all the others try to jump in. Having a eye for that next move is very keen. Every one is just not blessed with that ability.
     

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