Giving my son a haircut!

Discussion in 'Casual Chat' started by Vishal P. Rao, Mar 7, 2006.

  1. Vishal P. Rao

    Vishal P. Rao Administrator Staff Member

    Any parents of young children here?

    My son (1 1/2 years old) doesn't allow any stranger to touch him so I have to cut his hair myself. Being super suspicious and curious by nature, he doesn't allow me to bring scissors near his head. And to satisfy his curiosity, I have to keep two pairs of scissors and comb.

    It took us (me to cut and my wife to distract him) one hour yesterday to give him a haircut [​IMG] - Distract him, snip, hand him your scissor, take his scissor, distract him, snip, run behind him, distract him, snip, hand him your sci....

    Any suggestions to help your Admin?
     
  2. netjobs

    netjobs Member

    Better cut his hair while he is on deeeeeep sleep... Its worked with my friends babies... [​IMG]
     
  3. WhitePhoenix

    WhitePhoenix New Member

    Ha... it's been a long time since I went through that scenario... but, if you're daring, why not let him try to cut a snip or two himself, just so he knows it won't be all that bad? But, of course, that comes with strong guidance to never use the scissors by himself, or to cut his hair by himself (Yeah, right. I have never met a parent yet without a 'child's haircut horror story).

    Oh.. .and Good Luck!
     
  4. netjobs

    netjobs Member

    and also to be a good work at home job [​IMG]
     
  5. A8ch

    A8ch Gold Member

    The haircutting experiences with your son will become fond memories that you'll enjoy later. Treasure them!

    Hermas
     
  6. Quoting: A8chThe haircutting experiences with your son will become fond memories that you'll enjoy later. Treasure them!

    Hermas
    Hey Vishal,

    They grow up too fast, enjoy it while it lasts.

    Joe
     
  7. Vishal P. Rao

    Vishal P. Rao Administrator Staff Member

    Quoting: netjobsBetter cut his hair while he is on deeeeeep sleep...

    That's not possible Jai because it's against our rituals to cut hair while someone is asleep.

    Quoting: WhitePhoenixbut, if you're daring, why not let him try to cut a snip or two himself, just so he knows it won't be all that bad?

    Nooooo! That's very dangerous Denise because he is too small and kids learn things very fast. If he learns scissors are used for snipping (not just hair), he'll start using them on every item he gets his hands on, and may be ocassionaly on his fingers too! So scissors, knives and all dangerous objects should be kept away from kids.

    Quoting: A8chThe haircutting experiences with your son will become fond memories that you'll enjoy later. Treasure them!

    Yes Hermas! I'm in fact enjoying and capturing every moment with him!

    And yes Joe, they indeed grow very fast. I'm already missing his first few months.
     
  8. WhitePhoenix

    WhitePhoenix New Member

    Vishal, I understand where you're coming from. But kids also learn what tools are acceptable and what tools are not for 'things'. For example, around where I live, nearly every family has guns. They are used mainly for hunting, and even the little ones get one at an early age, ALONG with guidance on their proper use and SAFETY issues. In the town I live in, the kids respect the power and danger of weapons of any kind and there has never been problems with them.

    The lesson goes farther than weapons however. With proper instruction, kids can learn about the dangerous world around them.
    Better they learn from you than from someone else who is not as concerned about their safety and wellbeing.

    When they are at a friend's house, there may be things laying around that you don't have laying around at your house.

    Same goes for little ones everywhere. Teach them young. I'm guessing yours is 2 or 3?? Then you are correct in that he would be too young to understand about the scissors now. But if he's 4 or 5, he's never too young to start learning about safety. The more they know about some things, the less 'attractive' and curious they are.

    And the more prone they will be to leave the dangerous stuff alone.

    At least, that's my two cents' worth. I've raised two kids. Sure, they had their accidents and did stupid things sometimes, but they learned.
     
  9. netjobs

    netjobs Member

    Its been turning to be something like kids thread and it could helps me also, because I am going to be a pretty happpppy dad for my new born baby expecting by end of this month to be delivered...[​IMG](better it might help after few years)
     
  10. Vishal P. Rao

    Vishal P. Rao Administrator Staff Member

    Quoting: WhitePhoenixThe more they know about some things, the less 'attractive' and curious they are.

    I very well agree with you Denise. The more restrictions you put on your child the more difficult it gets to restrain their curiosity. It's no wonder that kids who are put on a tight leash at home are the ones who are more prone to do dangerous things when they grow up.

    Children learn very fast and like you said, with proper guidance and supervision, its best to allow them to learn things themselves. Experience is the best teacher.

    However, mine is just 1 year 8 months and I think he still needs some time to get his hands on scissors [​IMG]

    Quoting: netjobsIts been turning to be something like kids thread and it could helps me also, because I am going to be a pretty happpppy dad for my new born baby expecting by end of this month to be delivered...(better it might help after few years)

    I'm now tempted to start a new forum on Raising children [​IMG]
     
  11. eclair

    eclair New Member

    I am still single but my two cents' worth:
    Maybe let him hold something that would comfort him while giving him a haircut? Maybe a pillow or something? [​IMG]

    I suppose that a bit later, he'll feel better about haircuts [​IMG]

    I also agree that he's a bit too young to start using scissors...

    As for a new forum: raising children is a good topic, I think [​IMG] People do need to talk about these things too [​IMG]
     
  12. Vishal P. Rao

    Vishal P. Rao Administrator Staff Member

    Quoting: eclairMaybe let him hold something that would comfort him while giving him a haircut? Maybe a pillow or something?

    Clair, that used to work wonderfully when he was 1 year old. Hmmm may be a new toy every time would keep him engaged for some time now [​IMG]
     
  13. WhitePhoenix

    WhitePhoenix New Member

    Ha, your son sounds like quite a cutie, Vishal, and you're right, he's WAY too young to start learning such lession... and it's not a bad idea for a new forum.

    I wish having kids came with a 'How-To' Manual - it would have made things so much easier at times! But that's the joy of parenthood; everyone raises their kids the way they feel is best, and those of us who have 'been there' and 'done that' can smile and laugh with glee that yet a new generation of parents are going to learn the pleasures and travails of raising children... and that none of us are unique in that aspect.

    No matter where you are from, children, and parents, seem to follow standard patterns... and just remember, netjobs - you are not alone!
     
  14. agoodsaid

    agoodsaid New Member

    I have but one word to offer .... SNACKS ... lol.

    Keep his yummiest snack for special (and emergency) moments just like this.

    Works for mine [​IMG]

    Andrea

    PS. I'm on the 'teach 'em about tools early' bandwagon too. As soon as they can get around some on their own, it's time. Maybe not sharp ones, but a kid version of whatever he sees you using. Otherwise, he'll use yours one way or another [​IMG]
     
  15. Vishal P. Rao

    Vishal P. Rao Administrator Staff Member

    Quoting: agoodsaidI have but one word to offer .... SNACKS ... lol.

    [​IMG] When I give my son a haircut, there is hair all around the place as he doesn't sit in one place. And if I give him something to munch, surely he'll eat few hair along with it [​IMG] So definitely no eatables Andrea!
     
  16. eclair

    eclair New Member

    Vishal:

    Quoting: Vishal P. RaoHmmm may be a new toy every time would keep him engaged for some time now

    A new toy might condition him to think he'd get one everytime he'd be getting a haircut. A possible drawback. Just my two cents' worth [​IMG]
     
  17. agoodsaid

    agoodsaid New Member

    Ahh, but "new" toys might not mean 'literally' new toys ... you might try keeping a box of favorites in rotation?

    Stash one away every now and again and bring it back out of hiding at useful moments when you want him occupied [​IMG]

    And then again, you probably already know that the box itself (and packing and unpacking it) are often more interesting than the toys themselves .

    Andrea
     
  18. Vishal P. Rao

    Vishal P. Rao Administrator Staff Member

    Quoting: eclairA new toy might condition him to think he'd get one everytime he'd be getting a haircut. A possible drawback.

    Very true and it must not repeated everytime. Just till he calms down and starts enjoying haircuts [​IMG]

    Quoting: agoodsaidStash one away every now and again and bring it back out of hiding at useful moments when you want him occupied

    That's simply not possible with my son. He remembers each one of his toys since his birth (and we have one cabinet dedicated to his toys only) [​IMG] And moreover he seems to be least interested with his toys but more interested with things we use - utensils, books, pens.... I think that's the case with most kids nowadays.
     
  19. Quoting: Vishal P. Raohe seems to be least interested with his toys but more interested with things we use - utensils, books, pens.... I think that's the case with most kids nowadays.
    Quoting: agoodsaid As soon as they can get around some on their own, it's time. Maybe not sharp ones, but a kid version of whatever he sees you using. Otherwise, he'll use yours one way or another
    Hey Vishal,

    These are both very true. Once they find your "toys" (read tools) there is no stopping them. Just make sure that is a "safe" toy.

    This is from a father with a 30 yr old son. He's doing fine now, and is an engineer (he liked my tools too).

    Joe
     
  20. made2prosper

    made2prosper New Member

    Buy yourself a flobbie... Is that what they are called... where you hook something up to a vacuum? Maybe the will intrigue him
     

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