Working from home advice?

Discussion in 'General Advice' started by skimpy, Mar 14, 2010.

  1. skimpy

    skimpy New Member

    I work for a large major company. They are offering a chance to work from home. I work 7-4. My job is based on productivity. Basically a per hour quota. I would like to hear from people who have a similar situation before deciding. I have researched it and am aware of the pros and cons. I am sure I can do it. I have a seperate office and do not have the typical distractions associated with working from home. If you are someone in a similar situation and have made the transistion from working in an office to working from home any advice or concerns would be appreciated. [​IMG]
     
  2. ShawnCharles

    ShawnCharles New Member

    Have you read the book, The 4 Hour Workweek by Tim Ferris. It's a great book that talks about what your going to be doing: working at home instead of the office.

    It has a lot of great ideas on how to be productive, outsource most of your work, and travel the world without your boss even knowing. I highly recommend the book.
     
  3. timbonderud

    timbonderud New Member

    skimpy
    The transition from a full time job to working at home fulltime can be interesting, i am a typical example. But it is absolutley best to still keep the full time job and build up the home business until it brings in enough to quit the regular job, it is lots of work doing both but it absolutely can be done.

    I hope you have found something great online, once a person has something they enjoy and have a passsion for makes all the difference in the world. I love working from home and having the freedom to live. Take Care
     
  4. dougster77

    dougster77 New Member

    The 4 hour work week is a great book. In a nutshell you should hire virtual assistants to do your work for your online businesses and monitor and tweek the results daily. It is a highly motivating book with some great ideas for internet and home based businesses.
     
  5. VictoriaNTC

    VictoriaNTC Silver Member

    A friends of mine is doing the same.
    She was concerned in the beginning, whether she would remain motivated and so on.

    She loves it!
    And, actually accomplishes much more due to less diotractions.
    I hope this helps,

    Victoria
     
  6. onera

    onera New Member

    Yes, do exactly shawncharles is suggesting. You have to very careful. Don't brag about it. If your boss finds out, she may fire you. Do it quitely. Another advantage if outsourcing is that you learn how to mange outsourced projects which is a very valuable skills to acquire. Good luck.
     
  7. Linda King

    Linda King New Member

    skimpy
    I worked from home before moving out of state and will have to say that I had many less distractins but you need to be sure you are dedicated enough not to slack off or ignore tasks. If you can transition part-time, like I did, you might find that easier.

    I would look at hiring help only if needed and look at resources that can teach time management skills.

    It certainly was a great move for me but isn't for everyone!
     
  8. liber8life

    liber8life New Member

    hello skimpy..

    you stated that you are sure you can do it then why confused? well, i do understand your concern though but if you're confident that you can handle that task then go for it.[​IMG] be positive about it! you can do it! perhaps, it will bother you at first but eventually you will be use to it. Remind yourself always to be responsible and everything will turn out fine..[​IMG]
     
  9. NewRich23

    NewRich23 New Member

    You've taken your first steps to success by realizing that you can do this! You have no distractions and you've done your research. Its going to be something new for you so naturally you will question yourself. Which is okay...just don't doubt yourself.

    Stay focused, don't quit and push...push...push...with time you will be fine.

    Good Luck![​IMG]
     
  10. michaelcole

    michaelcole New Member

    Hi skimpy,

    As you make the switch from driving to the office to cyber-commuting one thing to remember is that it is still your job, not your home business.

    Set up a regular schedule, and stick to it.

    When you get ready to go to work get ready as if you are going to the office, at least at first. This will remind you that you are on someone eles's time.

    Take the same breaks that you would at work, short breaks help you to focus better.

    Dressing for work and taking scheduled breaks will make your home office seem like your private offic at work. You will get more done in less time, maybe in 50 to 75 percent of the time.

    You said you have a per hour quota, when you start filling your quota in less time you might want to look into starting a home based business in the extra time.

    Mike
     
  11. justinhand

    justinhand New Member

    Well you will certainly be saving a lot of gas money!

    Seriously though working from home is truly a blessing.
     
  12. bosco

    bosco New Member

    ShawnCharles: Have you read the book, The 4 Hour Workweek by Tim Ferris. It's a great book that talks about what your going to be doing: working at home instead of the office.

    It has a lot of great ideas on how to be productive, outsource most of your work, and travel the world without your boss even knowing. I highly recommend the book.
    Wow, outsource and don't tell your boss. LOL That's funny.

    Many jobs required specialized knowledge and outsourcing isn't an
    option for a great deal of the work.

    I do quesiton outsourcing to the lowest bidder, on moral grounds.
    Just because people are willing to work for pennies per hour, is it moral to do so?

    For that matter, is it moral to shop at Walmart where almost everything is made in slave labor conditions?

    I'm just asking

    As for working from home in general, I love it. To not have to commute and have the comforts of home is unsurpassed, in my book.

    Good luck!
     

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